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By 5 October 2016 | Categories: news

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At Google I/O this year, the company began to shed light on its plans for smart homes and the technology that would enable it. That picture became clearer as Google Home was introduced to the world, with the Mountain Valley-based company aiming to place its Assistant AI system at the heart of one's household.

Enriched with the power of Google's search, the Home speaker can do a multitude of tasks by prompting the familiar words, "OK Google". The first and most immediate application is as a music player, with Google partnering with a number of streaming platforms and music companies to cover all its bases. Added to this is Assistant AI-like functionality, with users capable of asking Google Home questions, given the right context. Added to this is integration with a number of high-fidelity audio device manufacturers, so music can instead be sent to a Bluetooth or Wi-Fi compatible speaker or sound system.  

Google Home can also be asked non-music related questions, leveraging the Google knowledge graph and other sources like Wikipedia. The company plans to have complete smart household controls in the near future too. To that end, systems like IFTT (If This Then That), Nest, Philips Hue and Samsung SmartThings, will be compatible with Google Home. It could then have the potential for users to operate their lights, air conditioning and other smart appliances with their voice remotely from the Google Home speaker.

Like the Pixel, Google Home is available for pre-order in the US from today, and will go on sale in November for $129. Its local status is still unknown for now though.


 

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